What is Precision Machine Technology?

04-7-16 PMT

The Precision Machine Technology program prepares students for a rewarding and challenging career by providing them with entry-level training for the manufacturing industry. The machining industry utilizes precision tools and equipment to transform engineers’ and designers’ visions into finished products. The training in the Precision Machine Technology program focuses on the skills that are in demand in the local and national job market.  These are the skills required by the high-tech modern manufacturing businesses such as aerospace, medical instrumentation, defense, and many more.

 

Students in the program learn the use of hand tools, manual machine tools, and Computer Numerical Control (CNC) machine tools to cut metals within .0001 of an inch. Curriculum topics include manual and CNC milling, manual and CNC turning, and precision grinding. As well as an extreme focus on precision Measurement. Students also learn interpretation of blueprint drawings to gain understanding of machining industry specifications. Training also includes precision inspection using sophisticated measuring equipment, a toolmaker’s microscope, and an optical comparator within the metrology lab, where quality assurance is emphasized.

 

For more information on the opportunities available through this program, please visit the "College Credits" and "Industry Certifications" links to the left.

  

Program Objectives 

  1. Complete PA Deptartment of Education POS (Program of Study)
  2. Complete NOCTI Competencies
  3. Obtain Industry Certifications (NIMS: Measurement, Materials, and Safety, Manual Milling Skills I, Turning Operations, Grinding Skills I, Drill Press Skills I, CNC Turning, CNC Milling)
  4. Earn College in the High School Credits (HACC)
  5. Industry Visit (Level 1)
  6. Post-Secondary Visit (Level 2)                                                                                                                                                                      

Level 1 

Certifications: NIMS Measurement, Materials, and Safety, NIMS Turning Operations

  • Orientation and Safety Procedures
  • Identify and Use Basic Precision layout Tools
  • Perform Layout Work for NIMS Certifications
  • Identify, Maintain, Use, and Calibrate Precision Measuring Tools
  • Describe Methods for Quality Control
  • Identify and Use Bench Hand Tools, Hand Arbors, and/or Hydraulic Presses
  • Assembly and Disassembly of Parts
  • Demonstrate Knowledge of OSHA Safety Standards for Operating Pedestal and Surface Grinding Machines
  • Identify Parts of a Pedestal Grinder
  • Properly Dress, Mount, and Test Grinding Wheels and Grind and Sharpen Various Lathe Tools
  • Safely and Properly Use Manual Lathe Machines
  • Identify and Utilize Proper Procedures for Using Vertical and Horizontal Power Saws
  • Identify and Explain Metal Classifications, Metal Property Applications, and Heat-Treating and Annealing Processes
  • Demonstrate the Use of Different Types of Charts
  • Utilize the Machinery's Handbook to Locate Specific Information
  • Identify and Utilize Skills Needed to Read Blueprints

POS TASKS:

  • 100s: Orientation/Safety
  • 200s: Performing Layout Work
  • 300s: Part Inspection
  • 400s: Bench Work
  • 600s: Grinding Machines
  • 700s: Lathes
  • 900s: Power Saw
  • 1000s: Machines and Tools
  • 1100s: Mettalurgy
  • 1200s: Charts and References
  • 1300s: Blueprint Reading

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                  

Level 2

Certification: NIMS Drill Press Skills I, NIMS Manual Milling Skills I, NIMS Grinding Skills I

CHS: MDES 207 (Machine Shop Theory and Practice) and MDRF 101 (Engineering Drawing)

  • Orientation and Safety Continued
  • Identify, Maintain, Use, and Calibrate Precision Measuring Tools
  • Safely and Properly Use a Drill Press
  • Identify the Parts of a Surface Grinder
  • Demonstrate Various Techniques Using a Surface Grinder
  • Properly Execute Various Techniques Using a Milling Machine
  • Demonstrate the Use of Different Types of Charts
  • Identify and Explain Metal Classifications, Metal Property Applications, and Heat-Treating and Annealing Processes
  • Utilize the Machinery's Handbook to Locate Specific Information

POS TASKS:

  • 100s: Orientation/Safety
  • 300s: Part Inspection
  • 500s: Drill Presses
  • 600s: Grinding Machines
  • 800s: Milling Machines
  • 1000s: Mettalurgy
  • 1200s: Charts and References

Employability Skills Training

Level 3 

Certifications: NIMS CNC Turning, NIMS CNC Milling

CHS: UA 205 (Computer Numeric Control)

  • Orientation and Safety Continued
  • Identify, Maintain, Use, and Calibrate Precision Measuring Instruments
  • Describe Methods Used for Quality Control
  • Demonstrate Proper Lubrication and Maintenance of Machinery
  • Select, Prepare, and Store Coolants, Cutting Oils, and Compounds
  • Inspect, Clean, and Maintain Work Area, Hand Tools, Cutters, Fixtures, and Attachments
  • Inspect and Adjust Machine Guards
  • Explain and Demonstrate CNC Machine Procedures
  • Safely Operate a CNC Machine
  • Demonstrate Data File Transfers into and Use of MDI Applications on CNC Machines

POS TASKS:

  • 100s: Orientation/Safety
  • 300s: Part Inspection
  • 1000s: Mettalurgy
  • 1400s: CNC Programming

OPTION: Cooperative Education

 

Is it for You?

Students seeking to enter this program should enjoy working with machines, both computerized and manual. Most positions in this field require work as part of a team, so students should be willing and able to work in groups. Employees tend to start "at the bottom", but can advance to management or supervisory positions; work weeks are typically 40 hours year round. 

 

It is important to note that the following skills are necessary for employment in this field:

  • Excellent mathematical ability.
  • Ability to work under strict guidelines and instructions.
  • Good eye and hand coordination.
  • Good eyesight (either naturally or with correction).

For more information on this program's objectives, please visit the "Task List" link to the left.

 

 

What Can You Do as a Graduate of Precision Machine Technology?

 

Employment Options 

* Salaries listed are PA state averages taken from www.onetonline.com and are accurate as of June 2016.

CNC Machine Tool Operators, Metal & Plastic ($38,140)

Machinists ($40,270)

Tool and Die Makers ($44,770)

Lathe & Turning Machine Tool Setters, Operators & Tenders, Metal & Plastic ($36,540)

Post-Secondary Studies

*Many employment options in this field require additional study.

Penn College: Machine Tool Technology, Automated Manufacturing Technology

Thaddeus Stevens: Machine Tool & Computer Aided Manufacturing